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September 16, 2019

September 16, 2019

Publishing News


Colvin Replacing Benett As Bloomberg Global Ad Chief
Adweek: "Andrew Benett, who was brought on to Bloomberg Media as its global chief commercial officer, is no longer in the role. Benett joined Bloomberg Media in 2017 in a newly created position for the publisher to build a group that was intended to go head-to-head with creative and public relations agencies. Stephen Colvin, who has been the global head of Bloomberg Live for more than two and a half years, will take his place. Benett will stay at the company to phase Colvin into the role until Oct. 15. Colvin’s new title will be global head of advertising and marketing, and he’ll report directly to Bloomberg Media CEO Justin Smith. In his position, he’ll continue to oversee Bloomberg Live as well as positions in marketing, practice and regional sales. Smith credited Colvin with doubling the number of live events and adding new franchises, calling him “an exceptional leader with deep knowledge of Bloomberg and years of experience in the media industry” in a note to staff on Tuesday.Specifically, franchises like Bloomberg Invest, Bloomberg’s Equality Summit and Sooner Than You Think were developed under Colvin.In his role at Bloomberg Media, Benett oversaw global ad sales, consulting and marketing services, building what Smith called a “strong foundation” for the company’s commercial approach. It’s not clear what position he’ll take next, and he did not immediately respond to requests for comment"...
 
Adweek 

Time Publishes Climate Change SIP; Intros Newsletter
MediaPost: On Friday, Time released an issue dedicated to climate change called “2050: How Earth Survived.” "The issue features an essay by author Bill McKibben that flashes forward to the year 2050, looking back on the steps society took to adjust to or stop climate change. It also features reporting from every continent with Time contributing editor Angelina Jolie writing about why the world needs to help Pacific Islanders as climate change progresses. Also offering their viewpoints on climate change are Al Gore, Jane Goodall and Graca Machel, former Education Minister of Mozambique and founding member of The Elders. Addressing why the magazine is tackling an issue on climate change now, Time EIC-CEO Edward Felsenthal wrote: “Human nature, like journalism, is deadline-­oriented. Our intent with this issue—only the fifth time in our history that we have turned over every page of a regular issue, front to back, to a single topic—is to send a clear message: We need to act fast, and we can.”The cover features a 98-foot x 65-foot sculpture created by Japanese sand sculptor Toshihiko Hosaka and a seven-person team.Launching with the issue is a new AR experience called “Inside the Amazon: The Dying Forest” that allows a user to follow a team of journalists sent by Time deep into the Amazon. The experience touches on indigenous people fighting illegal logging and paths cut away in the forest by loggers, among other scenarios.A new biweekly climate-focused newsletter called “One.Five” is also launching with support from Time climate correspondent Justin Worland. The newsletter will connect major stories and issues to climate change and track progress across industries. The UN’s goal is to keep global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2050"...
 

CBS Profiles New York Magazine
CBS News: "Even if you're not a New Yorker, you may know New York magazine. It was the original city magazine, one of the first magazines for both men and women. It's won 48 National Magazine Awards, and not long ago it celebrated its 50th anniversary. The magazine, said editor Adam Moss, "was never really about the concrete of the city. It was a way of looking at the world. A certain kind of hyper-curiosity, cynicism, and also openness and generosity to new ideas."After 15 years, Moss recently stepped down as editor-in-chief. The magazine originated in the heyday of New York City newspapers. The New York Herald Tribune had a Sunday magazine called "New York." Its editor was Clay Felker, and Milton Glaser was the art director. In the late '60s the New York Herald Tribune, like many newspapers in that period, went out of business. So, Felker and Glaser bought the name "New York" from the Tribune owners, and in 1968 the magazine as we know it was born"... Article goes into some of the great writers who have contributed to New York, as well as some of its famous covers (including the post-Hurricane Sandy shot of half of NYC in blackout, and the one showing Bill Cosby's accusers)… Today, there are five spinoff websites, with a total of 50 million readers a month: Intelligencer (about news and politics); The Cut (fashion and women's interests); Vulture (pop culture); Grub Street (food); and Strategist (buying advice), for which Pogue writes tech reviews."I feel like they're each sort of could be a standalone website that's under the umbrella of New York Magazine," said Allison P. Davis, who writes for both the printed magazine and The Cut... "I think we've worked really hard to make our digital brands just as prestigious and thoughtful and sharp as our print magazine's legacy has been," [said Davis]. "And so, I think to our readers there's really no difference."After serving as an editor for 12 years, David Haskell has just become the magazine's new editor-in-chief. "As nervous-making as it is to step into the job, I feel like I understand what this place is about," he said. New York Magazine may have outlasted dozens of rival publications, but it's had to make some tough financial choices. In 2014, it went from weekly publication to biweekly. Earlier this year, the company laid off five percent of its staff. And as of late last year, once you've read a few articles for free, you're asked to pay $5 a month for access to its websites.Haskell said, "I don't think we're ever gonna be your first read of the day. But I think – I hope – we'll be your favorite.""
 

Wired EIC: Publishers More Wary of Working With Tech
The Information: "Publishers have grown wary of doing deals with tech companies like Apple and Facebook, says Wired Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Thompson, aware that the terms of the deals often favor the tech companies over the news outlets. “I think that the journalism industry is appropriately wary of these platforms, and they’ve noticed that the terms of the deals often change,” Thompson said at The Information’s annual Media Bootcamp event in New York City. “And that in the deals with the platforms, the platforms tend to get the better of it. That said, ultimately, there will be a deal with these platforms""...
 

Kalmbach to Close Snowmobiler
TalkingNewMedia: "While the publisher said the magqzine’s circulation was around 33,000, the latest circulation statement reported that 21,722 of that was paid, down from just under 46,000 a decade ago. Folio: has reported via Twitter that Kalmbach Media will be closing American Snowmobiler citing a decline in the market for snowmobiles"...
 

AriZona Iced Tea Publishes Print Magazine
MediaPost: "AriZona Iced Tea has launched a limited-edition print magazine to celebrate its 27-year-old Brooklyn roots and the bodegas in which its beverages were originally sold.Titled Great Buy 99¢ Magazine, the 54-page glossy publication will be free with the purchase of one of the brand’s 23.5-ounce beverages and sold alone for 99¢. “It’s definitely an out-of-the box concept. Most CPG companies would probably think we’re crazy, but we think it’s cool,” Wesley Vultaggio, creative director and son of AriZona founder Don Vultaggio, tells Marketing Daily.Designed to resemble an iconic fashion publication, the magazine depicts New York City through the lens of contemporary fashion, street culture and the bodega scene. Among its six feature stories is a tableau of AriZona’s iconic colors through makeup, hair and nail design by Britney Tokyo; images of AriZona’s skateboard team; an oral history of the New York bodega as told by three owners; and a preview of fall fashion on the streets of Brooklyn... the magazine is a “limited edition” and plans for additional issues are up in the air. “We’ll see how it goes. Right now, the plan is there is no plan. We wanted to take a stab at doing a print magazine, and we’re really proud of how it turned out,” Vultaggio says'...
 

Hearst Acquires Aviation SaaS Company
Release: "Hearst today announced it has agreed to acquire CAMPSystems International Inc. from private equity firm GTCR. CAMP is a leading globalprovider of software-as-a-service (“SaaS”) solutions for managing and tracking themaintenance of jets, turbo prop aircraft and helicopters used in business aviation, as well as enterprise information systems used to manage service centers. CAMP serves morethan 19,000 aircraft, 30,000 engines and 1,300 maintenance facilities globally. Headquartered in Merrimack, New Hampshire, CAMP has 12 offices around the world... Terms were not disclosed. CAMP’s tracking software serves an essential market need as nearly all business aircraftowners require maintenance tracking software to comply with global regulations andguidelines, ensure aircraft safety and improve operating efficiency.Strategically, Hearst continues to diversify into data and information-based companies,while growing its world-class media assets"...
 

Google, Facebook Expand News Initiatives
MediaPost: "Google has tweaked its algorithms to prioritize original reporting, while Facebook has enlarged its focus on local news.Google has adjusted its search algorithm to give more weight to articles with original reporting. The algorithm will keep those articles at the top of search results for longer periods of time.“While we typically show the latest and most comprehensive version of a story in news results, we've made changes to our products globally to highlight articles that we identify as significant original reporting,” Richard Gingras, Google’s VP of news, wrote in a blog post. “Such articles may stay in a highly visible position longer. This prominence allows users to view the original reporting, while also looking at more recent articles alongside it,” noted Gingras.“This means readers interested in the latest news can find the story that started it all, and publishers can benefit from having their original reporting more widely seen,” he added.Google also introduced a change to help gather new feedback, so its automated ranking systems can better surface original content. Google uses over 10,000 third-party raters to give feedback on search results. Changes to its search guidelines mean raters will now give the highest rating to original news reporting “that provides information that would not otherwise have been known had the article not revealed it.” Conversely, Facebook announced this week that it is expanding its “Today In” service from 400 cities and towns across the U.S. to 6,000.Created last year, “Today In” aggregates local news in a users’ vicinity and is available only in Facebook's mobile app. It is one of the efforts the tech company is investing in to promote local news, such as Facebook’s Journalism Project. So far, Facebook says, 1.6 million people have activated the feature, receiving news from about 1,200 publishers every week. This all comes during the same week that executives from seven newspaper companies lobbied Capitol Hill to urge Congress to pass the “Journalism Competition and Preservation Act.” The bill would allow publishers to collectively negotiate with the duopoly and fight their dominance in the digital content business, according to the News Media Alliance, a trade organization that represents more than 2,000 news organizations in the U.S. Reports show the duopoly is taking 60% of digital ad revenue."
 

Daily Beast Finds Cutting Sub Price Pays Off
Digiday: "Since The Daily Beast launched its membership program, Beast Inside, last summer, the IAC-owned news brand has managed to improve the program’s revenue prospects by offering more content and charging less for it. Over the past 15 months, the price of a Beast Inside membership has dropped 65%, to $35 per year or $4.99 per month. That offer is the fourth pricing combination that the Beast has tested since launch, but it delivers the best combination of conversion rate and retention; conversion rates on the $35 offer were five times higher than the rates on the membership’s initial price points of $100 per year or $9.99 per month"...
 

Print Readers Are Most Likely To Pay For Local News
MediaPost: "Most U.S. adults believe their local news media is doing well financially, although only a small portion of them are willing to pay for it, according to a surveyby Pew Research Center. It found that 71% of U.S. adults believe their local news media is in good financial health, but only 14% paid for a subscription, donated money or signed up for a membership, such as for a local public broadcaster.However, there are significant differences in how people perceive print, broadcast, radio, internet and social-media news outlets.Print media has the highest portion of paying audiences, with 39% of U.S. adults who prefer to get their news from a local newspaper saying they paid for it. That’s ahead of 16% for radio, 12% for a news website or app, 10% for TV and 8% for social media. Most U.S. adults believe their local news media is doing well financially, although only a small portion of them are willing to pay for it, according to a surveyby Pew Research Center.It found that 71% of U.S. adults believe their local news media is in good financial health, but only 14% paid for a subscription, donated money or signed up for a membership, such as for a local public broadcaster.However, there are significant differences in how people perceive print, broadcast, radio, internet and social-media news outlets. Print media has the highest portion of paying audiences, with 39% of U.S. adults who prefer to get their news from a local newspaper saying they paid for it. That’s ahead of 16% for radio, 12% for a news website or app, 10% for TV and 8% for social media."
 

OTHER NEWS OF NOTE:







Retail News


Online Grocery Market Grows 15%, to 6% of Grocery Spend
PG: "Online grocery sales have grown more than 15% on a YoY basis and now account for 6.3% of total grocery-related spending by households in the U.S., according to a new report. Retail insights firm Brick Meets Click just released an analysis on the state of the U.S. online grocery market. According to the analysis, several factors are driving the growth of the U.S. online grocery market in 2019: Household penetration, based on past-month shopping activity, has risen more than five percentage points over the last year to nearly 25% of all U.S. households. This gain is largely the result of aggressive expansion of home delivery and pickup services available at brick-and-mortar stores, which collectively are now accessible to 90% of all the households in the U.S. -- up from 81% in 2018. Average order values, encompassing ship-to-home, home delivery, and pickup orders, have climbed over 6% to $70 in 2019. When only analyzing home delivery and pickup orders across various retail trade channels, the average order value grew 13% to just over $100. Online purchase frequency for groceries remains relatively unchanged versus last year, averaging two orders during the past month for active online grocery customers. Ship-to-home orders account for 50% of all online grocery orders while pickup captures 28% and home delivery 22% of the orders respectively. “There’s still a fair amount of purchase trial -- occurring as consumers search for acceptable online shopping alternatives,” said David Bishop, partner at Brick Meets Click. “For example, we found that approximately one-third of the active households’ most recent online order was the first time they used the service.” According to the analysis, online providers are improving the shopping experience as the likelihood to use a specific service again jumped from 69% in 2018 to 81% this year. Improving the ability to find the products that a customer wants to purchase is a key factor and the percentage of customers who found everything they wanted to buy rose to 90% in 2019, a 12 percentage points gain versus last year"...
 

Walmart Opens 1st Health Center, Pet Clinic
PG: "Walmart has opened the first-ever Walmart Health center in Dallas, Georgia, and remodeled the adjacent supercenter with new features aimed at improving the customer experience.The Walmart Health center plans were announced last month, and it offers primary care, labs, X-ray and EKG, counseling, dental, optical, hearing, community health (nutritional services, fitness), and health insurance education and enrollment. It will be staffed with physicians, nurse practitioners, dentists, behavioral health providers and optometrists. The center has an entrance separate from the store for patientsCustomers can also bring their pets to Walmart for the new in-store Essentials PetCare clinic. Services are available for dogs and cats and include vaccinations, routine care, microchipping, lab work and treating minor illnesses. Walmart described its aim for "low, transparent pricing" for both its human and canine customers. A summarized list of prices can be found online"...
 

Kroger Plans Fifth Ocado Automated Warehouse in Dallas
SN: "As part of its partnership with U.K. online grocer Ocado, The Kroger Co. has identified Dallas as the fifth location to build an automated warehouse to fulfill online grocery orders.Kroger and Ocado said yesterday that the 350,000-square-foot customer fulfillment center, to be located off Interstate 20 at the corner of 4200 Cleveland Rd. and 4241 Telephone Rd. in Dallas, is slated to become operational within 24 months after the scheduled groundbreaking in early 2020"...
 

Whole Foods to Cut Part-Time Worker Medical Benefits
SN: "Whole Foods Market has confirmed that it plans to eliminate health care benefits for part-time workers constituting nearly 2% of its workforce.Under the move, employees who work at least 20 hours but less than 30 hours per week won’t be able to enroll in company-provided medical benefits effective Jan. 1. A Whole Foods spokeswoman said in an email Friday that less than 2% of the Austin, Texas-based retailer’s employees currently buy into benefits offered via the company’s health plan. “In order to better meet the needs of our business and create a more equitable and efficient scheduling model, we are moving to a single-tier, part-time structure,” Whole Foods said in a statement. “The small percentage of part-time team members in the second tier who previously opted into medical benefits through Whole Foods Market’s health care plan — less than 2% of our total workforce — will no longer be eligible to buy into medical coverage through the company.”News of the planned benefits cut emerged yesterday in a report by BusinessInsider, which estimated that the move would impact about 1,900 of Whole Foods’ 95,000 employees. Whole Foods Market has confirmed that it plans to eliminate health care benefits for part-time workers constituting nearly 2% of its workforce.Under the move, employees who work at least 20 hours but less than 30 hours per week won’t be able to enroll in company-provided medical benefits effective Jan. 1. A Whole Foods spokeswoman said in an email Friday that less than 2% of the Austin, Texas-based retailer’s employees currently buy into benefits offered via the company’s health plan.Related: Grocery workers ratify new contract in Southern California“In order to better meet the needs of our business and create a more equitable and efficient scheduling model, we are moving to a single-tier, part-time structure,” Whole Foods said in a statement. “The small percentage of part-time team members in the second tier who previously opted into medical benefits through Whole Foods Market’s health care plan — less than 2% of our total workforce — will no longer be eligible to buy into medical coverage through the company.”News of the planned benefits cut emerged yesterday in a report by BusinessInsider, which estimated that the move would impact about 1,900 of Whole Foods’ 95,000 employees. Whole Foods noted that the change won’t eliminate any jobs and that all part-time staff remain eligible for the team member discount, 401k, paid time off (PTO), the team member assistance plan, home and auto insurance, company discounts and online learning."
 

Stop & Shop Opens Refreshed Stores on Long Island
SN: "Stop & Shop has brought its new look to Long Island, a key market in metropolitan New York. The Ahold Delhaize USA supermarket chain today debuted 21 upgraded stores in Suffolk County as part of a $133 million capital investment to enhance the shopping experience. The launch follows the reopening of 21 remodeled stores last October in Hartford, Conn., which kicked off a five-year capital spending plan — estimated at $1.6B to $2B — to refresh Stop & Shop stores chainwide... The Quincy, Mass.-based retailer currently has more than 50 stores under the Stop & Shop banner on Long Island, where the chain is by far the grocery retail market leader, with around a 25% share... Enhancements at the Suffolk County stores, located in the eastern half of Long Island, include expanded produce sections with more organic and locally grown fruit and vegetables; more prepared foods, such as stir fry stations, sushi bars, hot bars and meats like brisket and pulled pork smoked in-store; in-store cafes offering smoothies, coffee, treats,and free wi-fi"...
 

Instacart Adds Chief Revenue Officer from Amazon
PG: "Instacart has hired ad sales veteran Seth Dallaire as its chief revenue officer, starting in November. Dallaire has spent the last five years as VP of global advertising sales and marketing at Amazon Advertising. Instacart notes that Dellaire drove unprecedented growth for Amazon’s advertising business across Amazon.com, Dellaire will be responsible for growing marketing and promotions partnerships with brands and retailers. He'll also be responsible for driving adoption of product offerings"...
 

Amazon Aims to Double Locker Program in Next Year
CNET: "Amazon for the past few years has installed its bright orange delivery lockers in many corners of the U.S., from hotel lobbies to convenience stores to supermarkets. Now, it's eyeing plans to install a lot more, hoping to use the lockers to speed up Prime shipments and bolster its logistics network.The e-commerce giant is quietly working to vastly expand its Amazon Hub Locker network, according to a person familiar with the company's plans. It set a goal to evaluate over 1,000 new locations for its lockers every month, with expectations to approve a significant chunk of those sites, the person added. At the moment, Amazon has fewer than 10,000 lockers located in US convenience stores, apartments and universities, the person said, so the plans point to an aggressive expansion."You're talking about almost doubling the program in one year," the person said"...
 
CNET 

Sobeys Sees Solid Fiscal Q1
SN: "Sobeys Inc. parent Empire Company Ltd. tallied food retail sales gains in its fiscal 2020 first quarter, with earnings per share in line with analysts’ estimates. For the quarter ended Aug. 3, food retail sales rose 4.4% to C$6.74B, from $6.46B a year earlier. Stellarton, Nova Scotia-based Empire attributed the increase to a strong performance across the business, the Farm Boy acquisition and positive internal food inflation, partially offset by lower fuel prices. Same-store sales excluding fuel grew 2.4% YoY, vs. a 1.3% uptick a year ago. Empire and Sobeys President and CEO Michael Medline said comparable-store customer traffic and basket size also were up in the quarter"...
 

OTHER NEWS OF NOTE:




 
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